blank'/> Promoting Success: September 2016
         

Tuesday, September 6, 2016

Algebra 1 Math Helper

Do you teach algebra concepts to your students?  The Common Core touches on algebraic thinking all throughout the elementary grades, even with lower elementary students. In the 5th grade Common Core standards, students begin algebraic expressions:

Write and interpret numerical expressions.
Use parentheses, brackets, or braces in numerical expressions, and evaluate expressions with these symbols.
Write simple expressions that record calculations with numbers, and interpret numerical expressions without evaluating them. For example, express the calculation "add 8 and 7, then multiply by 2" as 2 × (8 + 7). Recognize that 3 × (18932 + 921) is three times as large as 18932 + 921, without having to calculate the indicated sum or product.


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Note: This blog post contains resources from our TpT store and our Amazon Associate store.

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So what strategies do you use to teach these concepts?  One method is to have students discuss solved problem structures and solutions to make connections among strategies and reasoning.

Some questions to help facilitate these discussions include:
  1. What were the steps involved in solving the problem? Why do they work in this order? Would they work in a different order?
  2. Could the problem have been solved with fewer steps? 
  3. Can anyone think of a different way to solve this problem? 
  4. Will this strategy always work? Why? 
  5. What are other problems for which this strategy will work? 
  6. How can you change the given problem so that this strategy does not work? 
  7. How can you modify the solution to make it clearer to others? 
  8. What other mathematical ideas connect to this solution? 
Questions to help facilitate the structure of problems:
  1.  What quantities—including numbers and variables—are present in this problem? 
  2. Are these quantities discrete or continuous? 
  3. What operations and relationships among quantities does the problem involve? Are there multiplicative or additive relationships? Does the problem include equality or inequality? 
  4. How are parentheses used in the problem to indicate the problem’s structure?
It is also helpful to review incorrectly solved problems. Can students analyze and discuss the errors? Can students fix the problems to make them correct?

Task cards are a great way to easily model algebra problems solved correctly.  Simply display a task card using the technology available in your room.  Interactive white boards work well.  Choose the 1st task card and show the correct steps and solution.  You may even want to choose the 2nd task card and show the incorrect steps and solution.  Students can compare and contrast the two examples.  You also may want to make a game out of it and have the students determine which one was done correctly. 

Here are some FREE algebra task cards from our TpT store to get you started:

 free algebra task cards for 5th and 6th grade


You will receive 6 Common Core task cards with a mix of multiplication and division math expressions for 6th grade. Task cards are a wonderful break from worksheets. Student can play SCOOT, have a scavenger hunt or play other games. Try them for free today. A student response form and answer key are also provided. 

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Click HERE for more printable algebra task cards and games.

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Note: More Department of Education math strategies may be found here.

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You may also like these printable Algebra activities and games from our Teaching Ideas and resources TpT store:

 Algebra Combining Like Terms


You will receive 2 anchor chart cards, 40 task cards, game ideas, a student response form, quiz and answer keys.

Common Core:
CCSS.Math.Content.6.EE.A.1
CCSS.Math.Content.7.EE.A.1 

Task cards are a great alternative to worksheets. These activities allow for movement in the classroom, which brain research shows increases achievement. Students can play SCOOT, have a scavenger hunt, or engage in other movement games.

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 Algebra Addition Task Cards


You will receive 42 algebraic expressions task cards, 2 anchor cards, game ideas, extension activity, quiz, student response form and answer key.

CCSS.MATH.CONTENT.6.EE.A.2
Write, read, and evaluate expressions in which letters stand for numbers.

Task cards are a great alternative to worksheets. They allow for movement in the classroom, which brain research shows increases achievement. Students can play SCOOT, have a scavenger hunt, or engage in other movement games.

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You will receive 42 task cards, 2 anchor chart cards, extended activity, student response form, quiz and answer keys.

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You may also like these resources from our Amazon affiliate store:

 Algebra Cheat Sheet


 algebra card game


 Algebra Mastery Game



 math brainteasers algebra


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Shelly Anton is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. ** This means there are Amazon affiliate links in these blog posts. This does not mean you pay a dime more when you purchase a product through the link. It just means I am trying to save you valuable teacher time by making it easier for you to find valuable resources for your students, and I earn a few cents for my research and time. Thank you for all you do for kids!

Thursday, September 1, 2016

Financial Literacy Activities for the Classroom

What is Financial Literacy?

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Note: This blog post contains products from our Teachers Pay Teachers store and Amazon Affiliate store.

Financial literacy is the ability to understand how money works in the world: how someone manages to earn or make it, how that person manages it, how he/she invests it (turn it into more) and how that person donates it to help others.


Financial Literacy: Mellody Hobson at TEDxMidwest

In a 2014 survey, three main questions were asked of respondents:

1. Suppose you had $100 in a savings account and the interest rate was 2 percent per year. After 5 years, how much do you think you would have in the account if you left the money to grow? 
More than $102; Exactly $102; Less than $102; Do not know; Refuse to answer.
2.  Imagine that the interest rate on your savings account was 1 percent per year and inflation was 2 percent per year. After 1 year, how much would you be able to buy with the money in this account? More than today; Exactly the same; Less than today; Do not know; Refuse to answer.
3. Please tell me whether this statement is true or false. “Buying a single company’s stock usually provides a safer return than a stock mutual fund.” 
True; False; Do not know; Refuse to answer.

In the United States, 38 percent of men answered all three questions correctly compared with only 22 percent of women. In the Netherlands, 55 percent of men and 35 percent of women got all three right, and in Germany the results were 60 percent for men and 48 percent for women.

In a 2016 Survey of the States, there were several key findings regarding financial literacy:

  • Since 2014, two additional states include personal finance in their K-12 standards and require those standards to be taught.
  • While more states are implementing standards in personal finance, the number of states that require high school students to take a course in personal finance remains unchanged since 2014 – just 17 states.
  • Only 20 states require high school students to take a course in economics – that’s less than half the country and two fewer states than in 2014.
  • There has been no change in the number of states that require standardized testing of economic concepts – the number remains at 16.
Financial literacy should begin in high school, not in college or even after college!

Here are a free resource to help you access your students' basic understanding of financial literacy concepts.

 Financial Literacy Vocabulary Activities

Click Free Financial Literacy to download this free resource.

 Financial Literacy Crossword Puzzle

Click financial literacy crossword puzzle to download this financial literacy crossword puzzle.


 Financial Literacy Activities

This bundle will save you money! (no pun intended!)

Click HERE for more resources from Edutopia.

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You may also like these resources from our Amazon affiliate store:


 Why Didn't They Teach Me This In School? money management tips


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99 Personal Money Management Lessons to Live By was initially developed by the author to pass on to his five children as they entered adulthood. As it developed, the author realized that personal money management skills were rarely taught in high schools, colleges and even in MBA programs. Unfortunately, books on the subject tend to be complicated, lengthy reads. The book includes eight important lessons focusing on 99 principles that will quickly and memorably enhance any individual's money management acumen. Unlike many of the personal money management books out there, this book is a quick, easily digested read that focuses more on the qualitative side than the quantitative side of personal money management. The principles are not from a text book. Rather, they are practical principles learned by the author as he navigated through his financial life. Many are unorthodox in order to be memorable and provoke deeper thought by the reader. Not only an excellent graduation gift for high school and college students but also a great read for any adult! 

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 financial literacy for teens college students and young adults book

Financial Literacy for Millennials: A Practical Guide to Managing Your Financial Life for Teens, College Students, and Young Adults

A modern primer on consumer finance and personal money management intended for readers aged 15 to 30, this guide can also serve as a primary text for high school, college, or adult education courses on personal finance.

• Provides an understanding of the structure and institutions constituting the U.S. economic system

• Shares knowledge about consumer finance and financial planning to enable young people to make better choices in their lives

• Shows how to save and invest prudently and use debt wisely and effectively

• Prepares millennials for the financial impact of life events so they will be empowered to take control of their financial futures

• Includes a series of tips that summarize the important lessons from the book

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 Personal Finance for middle school junior high students


Learn how to plan and manage your personal finances, achieve a financially successful life, and take responsibility as a citizen. PERSONAL FINANCIAL LITERACY, Second Edition, is aligned with the Jump$tart Coalition's National Standards for Personal Financial Literacy. The personal focus of this course makes it relevant and meaningful to all; in particular, to those just starting down the path to personal financial independence.

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Shelly Anton is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. ** This means there are Amazon affiliate links in these blog posts. This does not mean you pay a dime more when you purchase a product through the link. It just means I am trying to save you valuable teacher time by making it easier for you to find valuable resources for your students, and I earn a few cents for my research and time. Thank you for all you do for kids!