blank'/> Promoting Success: January 2013
         

Tuesday, January 29, 2013

Why Use Rubrics in Education?



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Top 10 Reasons to Use Rubrics Teachers Pay Teachers Promoting-Success


Do you use rubrics as assessment tools? 

Do they enhance student performance? 

Do they consume more time? 

Are they worth it? 

Why use them?


What is a grading rubric?

A rubric is a coherent set of criteria for students' work that includes descriptions of levels of performance quality on the criteria.

Here are my top 10 reasons why (and how) teachers should use rubrics in their classroom assessments: 

1.  Rubrics can be created to align with common core standards while assessing skills on a continuum. 

2.  By examining the targeted skills with the student prior to the task, the student has clear expectations prior to and during the task. Yes, students should be given the rubric BEFORE the task is assigned. Would you want your supervisor to give you a task, you complete it, and then you see the evaluation criteria? Nope. 

3. Teachers and students can set targeted goals in relation to skills rather than grades or percentages. 

4. Communication with parents is enhanced. A rubric assessment tells why a student received a specified letter grade in terms of skill acquisition. 

5. Self assessments help student’s take ownership in their own learning and increases motivation and achievement.
 
6. Precise feedback can be given with clear direction on how to improve performance. 

7. Students can examine their own performance and make adjustments prior to submitting work. (Once again, the student must have the rubric prior to completing the task!) We want self-directed life long learners! 

8. Progress on specific skills can easily be monitored over a period of time with consistency. 

9. Grading becomes less subjective with clearly defined skill objectives. Bias is minimized. 

10. Assessment time is reduced while consistency and effectiveness is increased. 

The key to the success of any rubric assessment tool is to have clear expectations for the students by teaching and sharing the rubric prior to assigning the task. 

NOTE: Not all rubrics are successful. Rubrics must be shown to the students BEFORE completing the task.  Also, rubrics must be written in OBJECTIVE, MEASURABLE terms.  Subjective, unclear rubrics are not effective.

Here is a sample rubric outcome, "Student will demonstrate understanding of the concept."  

This is not a clear and measurable outcome. HOW will the student demonstrate understanding? What do you mean by "understanding"?  

This outcome would be better defined:

3 Points:  Student writes three facts about the constitution.
2 Points: Student writes two facts about the constitution.
1 Point: Student writes one fact about the constitution.
0 Points: Student is unable to write one fact about the constitution.

Click HERE to read an article from Edutopia about clear expectations.

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You may like these rubrics from our TpT store:



This packet contains a bundled set of 10 of grading assessments for math, literacy, science, social studies and special education. You will receive 22 total scoring rubrics including teacher rubrics and student self-assessments. 














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You may also like these resources from our Amazon Associate store:


 how to write rubrics for teachers

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 what are rubrics why use them

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 rubrics for formative assessment

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Shelly Anton is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. ** This means there are Amazon affiliate links in these blog posts. This does not mean you pay a dime more when you purchase a product through the link. It just means I am trying to save you valuable teacher time by making it easier for you to find great resources for your students, and I earn a few cents for my research and time. Thank you for all you do for kids!

Sunday, January 27, 2013

Bible Verse Emergency Numbers

I'm not sure where this originated.  If you know, please let me know so I can give credit!

Bible Verse Emergency Numbers

Scripture HELP!

Teachers Pay Teachers Promoting-Success

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You Can Always Turn To God When You Need Him - Bible Emergency Numbers!!



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You may also like these printable Christian posters from our TpT store:


 emergency posters

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 bible emergency numbers shirt
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Shelly Anton is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. ** This means there are Amazon affiliate links in these blog posts. This does not mean you pay a dime more when you purchase a product through the link. It just means I am trying to save you valuable teacher time by making it easier for you to find great resources for your students, and I earn a few cents for my research and time. Thank you for all you do for kids!

Friday, January 25, 2013

How to Teach Problem Solving to Kids

I wanted to share this video about being stuck on an escalator.  We have used it in some professional development meetings.  It can be relevant to so many topics: thinking outside the box, teaching problem solving skills, leadership, taking action, and more.

Teachers Pay Teachers Promoting-Success

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Stuck on an Escalator - Take Action

Problem Solving Video



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Take Action Motivational Video



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You may also like this problem solving poster from our TpT store:

Steps to Problem Solving Poster

 problem solving poster school counseling strategies

This adorable, printable owl poster makes a nice problem solving anchor chart to help students remember the steps to good problem solving.

Step 1: Define the Problem
Step 2: Ask Questions
Step 3: Think of Possible Solutions
Step 4: Test Your Ideas
Step 5: State the Solution
Step 6: Evaluate the Solution

You will actually receive a second problem solving sign as well! (GATOR)

GIVEN: What is the important information?
ASK: For what is the question asking?
THINK: What is the last step? Estimate.
ORGANIZE: What operations? Make a plan.
REASONABLE: Does your answer make sense?
I'm owl-ways proud of you when you use your strategies!

You will receive TWO printable problem solving posters.

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You may also like these resources from our Amazon Associate store:


 school counseling conflict resolution ball

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 the solution ball
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 school counseling problem solving cards
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 conversation starters problem solving for kids

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 the coping game for kids

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Shelly Anton is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. ** This means there are Amazon affiliate links in these blog posts. This does not mean you pay a dime more when you purchase a product through the link. It just means I am trying to save you valuable teacher time by making it easier for you to find great resources for your students, and I earn a few cents for my research and time. Thank you for all you do for kids!

Thursday, January 24, 2013

Winter Fingerplays, Songs, Games & Activities for Kids

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It has been bitter cold here in Iowa.  However, we are looking for a warm-up next week. Yes, sometimes above 30 is considered warm! LOL  Here it is:


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Teachers Pay Teachers Promoting-Success

Since we are still "enjoying" the winter weather, I thought I would share some fingerplays for winter. I apologize for not being able to quote the exact source of each one.  I pulled them from a file. ;) Please let me know if you know any so I can give credit.


Snowflakes falling, falling down, (flutter fingers)

The wind blows them round and round. (circular motion)

they whip and whirl in the air

Then land softly everywhere.

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I built a snowman out of three balls - 1, 2, 3 (three fingers)

One ball was small, one middle-sized, and one as big as can be!

(form three circles, each larger)

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I like to play in the snow, (flutter fingers)

But every time I want to go,

I hear my mom say, (hand to ear)

"It's a very cold day, (shiver)

Bundle up, zip up, (pretend to dress)

Boots, gloves, and hat on."

After I dress from here down, (point to head then toe)

I feel as clumsy as a clown. (act clumsy)

Dressing up sure is a bummer! (shake head sideways)

Why isn't there snow in the summer?

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 I'm a Little Snowman Songs for Kids



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Indoor Activities for Kids in the Winter



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Winter Brain Break - Jingle Bells



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Indoor Recess Games


Click HERE for 10 indoor recess ideas from Scholastic, including shadow puppets, balloon volleyball, and some team games.



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Free Printable Crossword Puzzle

Click on the picture to enlarge.  Then right click to print or save.




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Free Printable Winter Day Mini Book

 free printable winter mini book for kids coloring worksheets

Click HERE to download this book from Crayola.

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You may also like these resources from our TpT store.


 free winter writing papers

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 free winter writing prompts

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Winter Projects or Fundraising


 cookies in a jar gift ideas fundraising winter Christmas

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 winter crafts interactive notebook craftivity

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 printable winter activities for kids

Click HERE for over 45 printable winter activities.

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You may also like these resources from our Amazon Associate store.


 winter game for kids

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 Christmas party winter game for kids

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 Peanuts winter classroom bulletin board


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Shelly Anton is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. ** This means there are Amazon affiliate links in these blog posts. This does not mean you pay a dime more when you purchase a product through the link. It just means I am trying to save you valuable teacher time by making it easier for you to find great resources for your students, and I earn a few cents for my research and time. Thank you for all you do for kids!

Tuesday, January 22, 2013

Classroom Behavior Management Strategies


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Classroom Behavior Management Strategies


Last week we discussed managing behavior in terms of reactive or proactive. Clearly proactive is the preferred choice in terms of modifying the environment and teaching coping skills or replacement behaviors. It is so very important to remember that all behavior is communication. The student isn’t just being “naughty” or “lazy.” There is a purpose for the behavior. It is our job to determine this purpose – much easier said than done, right? If the child’s behavior is significantly disrupting the learning of self or others, then I highly recommend conducting a formal behavior analysis and behavior intervention plan. This is NOT necessarily a special education issue and should first be done through general education interventions (Response to Intervention). There are extensive books and research on these topics, so I won’t go into huge detail here. Next Monday Mall, I will share several recommended books on this topic. Please “JOIN this site,” so you won’t miss any valuable information! It is always a good idea to collaborate with a behavior resource team, problem solving team, etc. in your school. The key is to target the specific behavior (through data collection), create an intervention plan, and MONITOR progress. Conducting several interventions at once is a common mistake and nearly impossible to determine what truly is effective or not. In addition, the student may become so overwhelmed that the undesired behavior increases! (Remember, though, in any intervention plan undesired behaviors may increase before they decrease.) 

So let’s target one behavior that is the most disruptive: the tantrum or out of control behavior. Obviously, it is impossible to teach coping skills when the student is in this “crisis” mode. Therefore, a proactive approach is essential! Teaching the child a script and/or how to use a “break” card is a great start. Both of these approaches should be taught over and over and over in a safe, non-triggering environment. Role play and make it rewarding.



A sample script could be:

1. Take a deep breath.

2. Count to 10.

3. Say, “I can stop _________.”

4. Say, “I can ___________ instead.”

So let’s say you have a student who tends to throw tantrums when he/she has to transition to a new activity. You know this because of careful formal and informal observations and data collection. So his script may look like this:

1. Take a deep breath.

2. Count to 10.

3. “I can stop kicking and screaming.”

4. “I can hold my teddy bear and walk to the next activity.”

On a side note, here are additional proactive environmental modifications for this behavior:

1. Set a 2 minute timer to prep for the transition.

2. Place specific music or different instruments to signal each new, different activity (i.e. drum to math, bell to reading)

3. Use a picture schedule (even if the student can read)

4. Use a “now/next” schedule

Here is another example. Let’s say you have a student who “shuts down” when given an independent task. Once again, you know this from data collection. You target the behavior by teaching the student to use a “help” card. You have collected additional data to determine the tasks are not too difficult and in the students independent to instructional level. Therefore, you believe the student has anxiety regarding getting a problem wrong and the actually starting process. 

1. Take a deep breath.

2. Read the directions on the paper.

3. “I can stop not doing my work.”

4. “I can raise my HELP card” or “I can do the first question then raise my HELP card.”

Remember, these scripts will take a lot of practice and reinforcement. It is not appropriate to try to “teach” these scripts when the student is escalated. New routines or scripts must be practiced consistently and positively for the best results.Also, positive behavior supports are essential!

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Building Behavioral Expertise Through Academic and Behavior Change
Dr. Laura Riffle

We were able to have Dr. Laura Riffle present to our district a few years ago. Our teachers felt her content was extremely helpful.



Part One



You may also like these autism and special education resources from our TpT store:

For a checklist of 175+ accommodations, click the picture:






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Click HERE to view our Teachers Pay Teachers Promoting Success store.

Click HERE to SUBSCRIBE to our newsletter for SECRET SALES and FREE printables.

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Shelly Anton is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. ** This means there are Amazon affiliate links in these blog posts. This does not mean you pay a dime more when you purchase a product through the link. It just means I am trying to save you valuable teacher time by making it easier for you to find valuable resources for your students, and I earn a few cents for my research and time. Thank you for all you do for kids!