blank'/> Promoting Success: 2011
         

Sunday, November 20, 2011

Reading Comprehension Strategies for Kids

So how do you improve reading comprehension in your elementary or junior high school?

Reading Comprehension Teachers Pay Teachers Promoting-Success

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From Doing What Works...

Teach students how to use several research-based reading comprehension strategies.


Good readers use comprehension strategies including activating prior knowledge or predicting, questioning, visualizing, monitoring, drawing inferences, and retelling. Children should be explicitly taught these strategies, have them modeled by the teacher, and be given opportunities to practice them with guidance and independently. 

Teach reading comprehension strategies individually or in combination.
Teaching reading comprehension strategies, whether one by one or in combination, improves children’s reading comprehension. Single-strategy instruction provides time for students to practice each strategy for a period of time before the next strategy is introduced. Multiple-strategy instruction introduces several strategies simultaneously to be practiced in combination. This approach helps readers learn to use strategies together from the very beginning, providing a more authentic reading experience. 

Teach reading comprehension strategies by using a gradual release of responsibility.

A gradual release of responsibility involves teachers first explaining and modeling a strategy, then giving students more and more independence in practicing and applying the strategy over time. 

Teach reading comprehension with multiple genres of text.

Teachers should introduce both literary and informational text to their students when teaching reading comprehension. Literary texts include narratives, which portray a story, or a sequence of related fictional or nonfictional events involving individuals or fictional characters, and poetry. Informational texts analyze or describe factual information about the natural or social world.

Choose high-quality texts of appropriate difficulty.

Teachers should choose texts carefully and consider both the content quality and difficulty level. Difficulty is defined by the text demands (e.g., decodability of the words, complexity of the sentences) and content demands (e.g., how complex, subtle, or abstract the information is). 

Use texts that support the purpose of instruction.

Reading comprehension instruction serves many purposes, and the text used should fit the purpose of instruction. For example, lessons on text structure begin with a text about a familiar topic in which the structure is easy to identify. When teaching students to make predictions, select a text that is unfamiliar to students or one in which many outcomes are possible.

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Shelly Anton is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. ** This means there are Amazon affiliate links in these blog posts. This does not mean you pay a dime more when you purchase a product through the link. It just means I am trying to save you valuable teacher time by making it easier for you to find valuable resources for your students, and I earn a few cents for my research and time. Thank you for all you do for kids!

Saturday, September 3, 2011

Helping Students with Behavior Problems

Autism Special Education Teachers Pay Teachers Promoting-Success

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Special Note to Another Teacher CUE

Things don't always go smoothly when our wonderful students come back to school. How do we help students with behavior problems?

We recently had some younger elementary students not wanting to stay in their seats. Instead of continually telling them to sit down, here are some intervention ideas to treat the children with dignity and respect...while helping them become great classroom learners.

Create a "special note" cue in your building. For example, "We have a meeting at 4:00." If little Johnny is having a hard time focusing or if he needs to take a break to prevent major escalation, have him deliver this note to any teacher. It would be preferable to choose a teacher, custodian, counselor, etc., who Johnny prefers and has developed a positive rapport.

When the receiving adult receives your note, he/she will know this "cue" and will take a few moments with the student to provide the break he needs. When the student has deescalated or has gotten the "wiggles" out, send him back to the classroom with the note, "Thanks for the reminder!"

Try it. It is a great way to accomplish your intended goal (a focused learner) while respecting individual needs of all students!
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You may also want to read this blog post:



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 Positive Behavior Support at the Tertiary Level: Red Zone Strategies



 NON-MEDICATED INTERVENTIONS FOR LEARNERS WITH ADHD

 Pacon Behavioral Pocket Chart, Blue
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Shelly Anton is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. ** This means there are Amazon affiliate links in these blog posts. This does not mean you pay a dime more when you purchase a product through the link. It just means I am trying to save you valuable teacher time by making it easier for you to find valuable resources for your students, and I earn a few cents for my research and time. Thank you for all you do for kids!

Saturday, February 12, 2011

Teaching Elementary Students Test Taking Strategies

Test.

It's a loaded word. Important...something to care about...something that can mean so much we get apprehensive thinking about it.

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Tests are important, especially to school children. A test may measure a basic skill. It can affect a year's grade. Or, if it measures the ability to learn, it can affect a child's placement in school. So it's important to do well on tests.

Besides, the ability to do well on tests can help throughout life in such things as getting a driver's license, trying out for sports, or getting a job. Without this ability, a person can be severely handicapped.

Your child can develop this ability, and you can help the child do it. Just try the simple techniques described in this report.

Why Test?

It's helpful for a child to understand why schools give tests, and to know the different kinds of tests.

Tests are yardsticks. Schools use them to measure, and then improve education. Some tell schools that they need to strengthen courses or change teaching techniques. Other tests compare students by schools, school districts, or cities. All tests determine how well "your child" is doing. And that's very important.

Most of the tests your child will take are "teacher-made." That is, teachers design them. These tests are associated with the grades on report cards. They help measure a student's progress--telling the teacher and the student whether he or she is keeping up with the class, needs extra help, or, perhaps, is far ahead of other students.

Now and then your child will take "standardized" tests. These use the same standards to measure student performance across the country. Everyone takes the same test according to the same rules. This makes it possible to measure each student's performance against that of others. The group with whom a student's performance is compared is a "norm group" and consists of many students of the same age or grade who took the same test.

Ask the School

It could be useful for you to know the school's policies and practices on giving standardized tests and the use of test scores. Ask your child's teacher or guidance counselor about the kinds of tests your child will take during the year--and the schedule for testing.

One other thing: some schools give students practice in taking tests. This helps to make sure that they are familiar with directions and test format. Find out whether your child's school gives "test-taking practice" on a regular basis or will provide such practice if your child needs it.

Avoid Test Anxiety

It's good to be concerned about taking a test. It's not good to get "test anxiety." This is excessive worry about doing well on a test and it can mean disaster for a student.
Students who suffer from test anxiety tend to worry about success in school, especially doing well on tests. They worry about the future, and are extremely self-critical. Instead of feeling challenged by the prospect of success, they become afraid of failure. This makes them anxious about tests and their own abilities. Ultimately, they become so worked up that they feel incompetent about the subject matter or the test.


 study skills test taking strategies


 test taking questionnaire

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Test Success: Test-Taking and Study Strategies for All Students, Including Those with ADD and LD

 Test Success: Test-Taking and Study Strategies for All Students, Including Those with ADD and LD


 Teaching Test-Taking Skills: Proven Techniques to Boost Your Student's Scores


 Saunders 2014-2015 Strategies for Test Success: Passing Nursing School and the NCLEX Exam, 3e (Saunders Strategies for Success for the Nclex Examination)


 Learning Outside The Lines: Two Ivy League Students with Learning Disabilities and ADHD Give You the Tools for Academic Success and Educational Revolution

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Shelly Anton is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. ** This means there are Amazon affiliate links in these blog posts. This does not mean you pay a dime more when you purchase a product through the link. It just means I am trying to save you valuable teacher time by making it easier for you to find valuable resources for your students, and I earn a few cents for my research and time. Thank you for all you do for kids!



Sunday, February 6, 2011

Day for any Date Math Trick for Kids

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Ultimate Mental Math Trick – How To Tell The Day For Any Date by: Stephen Tan

Can you tell the day for any date without a calendar at hand? Is that really possible? It is actually a simple skill that any one can learn. It is also very practical as you may always consider your availability for an activity or an event or you just need to know the day of anyone’s birthday. All you need is a little bit of practice, then you can quickly and easily tell the day of the week of practically any date in history or in the future.


Here’s the Secret


You may need to memorize some codes to learn this trick, but they are very easy to remember.


First, we assign a code number to every day of the week.

Monday – 1

Tuesday – 2

Wednesday – 3

Thursday – 4

Friday – 5

Saturday – 6

Sunday – 7 or 0


Second, we assign a code number for every month of the year. These month codes are used for every year with two exceptions. In a leap year, the month code for January is 5* and for February is 1*.


The month codes with the corresponding mnemonics are as follows:

January – 6* (WINTER has 6 letters)

February – 2* (2nd month)

March – 2 (You march with 2 feet)

April – 5 (APRIL has 5 letters)

May – 0 (May0 for mayonnaise)

June – 3 (JUN has 3 letters)

July – 5 (JULIE has 5 letters)

August – 1 (August begins with an A, the 1st letter)

September – 4 (SEPT has 4 letters)

October – 6 (Halloween TRICKS or TREATS have 6 letters each)

November – 2 (2nd last month)

December – 4 (XMAS has 4 letters)


Third, we assign a code number for every year. For example, the year code for 2011 is 6.


The Formula Day of the week = (Month code + Date + Year Code) mod 7


Note: mod 7 indicates the remainder you get when you divide by 7.


Examples What is the day for July 16, 2011?

Day of the week = (Month code + Date + Year Code) mod 7

Day of the week = (5 + 16 + 6) mod 7 = 27 mod 7 = 6 (Therefore, it’s a Saturday)


What is the day for December 25, 2011?

Day of the week = (Month code + Date + Year Code) mod 7

Day of the week = (4 + 25 + 6) mod 7 = 35 mod 7 = 0 (Therefore, it’s a Sunday)


Hooray! With constant practice, you are now ready to be the walking calendar. Amaze your friends, colleagues, students, teachers and everyone else.

For further information on how to find the year code, check out my blog at http://www.themathblog.com/.

About The Author
Stephen Tan has been teaching mathematics for almost ten years now. He has coached and trained students to compete in mathematics competition and through his leadership has won various mathematics awards. His teaching of mathematics is fun and very logical according to many students. He also teaches students to solve mathematics problems the shortest and easiest way. And now he reveals his secret on how to tell the day for any date without the aid of a calendar.

The author invites you to visit:http://www.themathblog.com/

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Click HERE for over 140 free printable teaching resources, including activities for math, science, literacy, holidays, special education and more!

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Shelly Anton is a participant in the Amazon Services LLC Associates Program, an affiliate advertising program designed to provide a means for sites to earn advertising fees by advertising and linking to Amazon.com. ** This means there are Amazon affiliate links in these blog posts. This does not mean you pay a dime more when you purchase a product through the link. It just means I am trying to save you valuable teacher time by making it easier for you to find valuable resources for your students, and I earn a few cents for my research and time. Thank you for all you do for kids!

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